ADS – Did I Save My Changes?

After working on a query for a long time, we want to make sure that we save the changes we have made.  I have lost hours of work over the years because I didn’t save the changes.  Azure Data Studio has a few features that can help prevent this from happening.

The first feature is that ADS can “save” your changes if ADS is restarted.  This can be turned off in Preferences.  I completed a blog post on this feature.  Here is the link.  This feature allows Azure Data Studio to remember what changes you made and will open the file when you restart ADS.

In SQL Server Management Studio an asterisk is placed on the tab the code is on.  Once you save the file, the asterisk will disappear.

Azure Data Studio is similar but instead of an asterisk, ADS uses a dot.

Once the file has been saved, the dot changes to an X.

What is interesting is that if the file has not been saved when ADS is closed, the unsaved state will be retained.  The next time you open ADS, the file will be opened, the changes will still be there and the file will be marked as not saved.

This is a short and simple blog post.  Thanks for visiting my blog!!!

ADS – Outdated Extensions

As you add more and more extensions to Azure Data Studio,  keeping them up to date could present a challenge.  Of course we will want to install all the extensions that we think might be helpful to us.  Luckily Azure Data Studio has a nice way to let us know if there is an extension that is out of date.

If you look at the extensions in the left vertical bar you will see a number over the extensions, the blue circle. That number represents the number of extensions that have updates available. In the image above, you can see that there is one extension that is out of date.

Now we need to find that particular extension.  You can do this by scrolling through you active extensions and look for the green box as in the above image.  This will take you to the proper location for the update.  In the case above, I needed to update the Redgate SQL Search extension.

This is an update to the VISX file.  Once you download it, you will then need to click on the “Install extension VISX package” item under the File menu.  Prior to installing the new version, I would suggest that you review exactly what the new version brings.

As with the initial install of the extension, it is possible that you may need to restart Azure Data Studio to complete the installation.  In this case, there was a nice reminder to do so.

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ADS – Query History Extension

I just downloaded the latest release of Azure Data Studio.  A new extension came with it that I really like, Query History.  According to the documentation, the Query History extension does this: “Adds a Query History panel for viewing and running past executed queries”.

This installation of this extension is pretty simple and does not require a restart of Azure Data Studio.  However, if you disable or uninstall the extension, you will need to restart ADS.

If you look at the View menu, you will notice that there is not a menu item for “Query History”.

This will change once the extension is installed.  You will find the Query History item just under Output.

Once you install the extension, you will now begin to see query history.  If you run a query, you will see the history as seen below.  If you to not see this at the bottom of the screen, go to the menu item mentioned above.

When you run a query, it takes a very short period of time for it to appear in the history.  In the above image,  I ran three queries, two of which were the same query.  This window is not part of the query window.  Since it is a separate window, it will collect queries from all tabs that are open.  Each row in the history will return three things, the query, the server and database uses as well as the times stamp of when the query was ran.  The server can be seen in the green box below.  Sometimes a forth item is included in the list of items returned, the icon that is at the far left of each row.

Now that we have history, let’s take a moment to see what we can do.  First of all, if you float your cursor over one of the queries, you will see a pop up.  This pop up will display the query.

You will see a lot more options if you right click on one of the queries.

All the options are pretty straight forward and really don’t need a great deal of explanation.  The bottom option, Pause Query History Capture I can see being useful if you are running query that you don’t want to be part of the history or just running too many queries at the moment.

Since these options are pretty straight forward, let’s take a look at a few questions.

What happens to the history when Azure Data Studio is closed?

The history is no longer available

What if I execute a batch, will each query in the batch be a separate line?

All the queries for the batch will be on the same line. The query in the green box is actually two select statements.

To the left of the query, I see a green check mark.  What are other icons I might see? 

There is currently only one other icon you might see. The red X when there is an error.

When there is a error, you will see a small number next to the “Problem” tab.  When you clock to this tab, you can now see details on what the error was.

What’s the difference between “Run Query” and “Open Query”?

Open query will do just that. Open the query so you can review the TSQL.  Run query will simply run the query and you will see any results if there are any.

Over all I really like this extension and can really see the practical use of it.  Just remember, this extension does not stored the queries beyond the Azure Data Studio session.

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Azure Data Studio – Process Explorer

Looking at processes in Windows Task Manager is something that most DBAs have done many times.  The need to do this hasn’t changed, however what has changed is how we can get information on the processes.

Prior to Azure Data Studio we would go to Task Manager in Windows.  Task Manager will look something like this.  You can see the name of the process, user name, PID number as well as CPU and memory utilization.

Azure Data Studio offers the ability to view these same processes, however the processes returned focus on Azure Data Studio related processes.

To open Process Explorer, go to the Help menu item and it is in that menu.  Just as in the image below.

Once open you will see familiar columns.  These columns include, CPU%, Memory(MB), pid and Name.  These are all Azure Data Studio related processes.

When you right click on one of the processes, you will see a somewhat familiar pop up menu.  The menu item will allow us to terminate the process, just as we have done many times in Task Manager.

This pop up menu is significantly smaller.  The task manager pop up has a ton more options including change priority and affinity. Below is what you will see in the pop up menu in Task Manager.

Looking at the image below, the left side is Azure Data Studio and the right is Windows Task Manager.  The important thing to note here is that in order to map the process to a process in Task Manager, the match will happen on the Pid column, as seen below.

Notice that the pids all point to the azuredatestudio.exe processes.  Azure Data Studio provides just a bit more information than Task Manager.  Please be careful changing the state of a service.  In other words, be careful stopping a process unless it is a last restore approach to fixing an issue.

In Task Manager the sort order for a column can easily be change.  You will need to put in just a bit of effort into determining what the proper sort order is.  When looking at the data in Process Explorer, the data cannot be sorted in any way.  It looks like it is sorted by CPU in descending order.

This is a pretty short blog, but I think it is a good idea to know thqt Process Explorer exists.  I really like that I can stay in the same tool and review related processes.

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